Weather Updates

Stay up to date with all weather conditions affecting transportation in the United States

 

Weather Update 10.6.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Oct 6, 2020 7:30:50 AM


While mostly tranquil weather will prevail for much of the country through Tuesday, the tropics have become more active with the formation of Hurricane Delta. Impacts along portions of the Gulf Coast are possible toward the end of the week. Potential Impacts: Texas, Louisiana, Florida

Hurricane Delta rapidly intensified into a Category 2 storm in the Caribbean Sea overnight, moving west-northwest at 15 mph with 100mph winds. It is forecast to approach the northern Gulf Coast late this week as a hurricane. While there is uncertainty in the track and intensity, hazards along the coast from LA to the western FL panhandle are expected to begin Thursday night or Friday. 

Delta became the ninth hurricane of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season on Monday evening, and is the earliest arrival of a 25th named storm.

 

 

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.23.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 23, 2020 7:32:39 AM


Post-Tropical Cyclone Beta will continue to bring heavy rainfall and flooding to parts of Texas and Louisiana, with areas of rainfall also gradually spreading across the Southeast. Elsewhere, Hurricane Teddy will remain in the Atlantic, but bring dangerous rip currents, high surf, and swells to much of the East Coast. A low pressure system in the northeastern Pacific will bring rainfall to the Northwest by Wednesday. States with Active Advisories: Texas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maine

Flooding Rainfall
Flash Flood Watches currently in effect across Southeast Texas and Southern Louisiana.
  • Texas - Upper Coast: 3-5 inches additional rainfall, up to 15 inches through this afternoon
  • Lower Mississippi Valley: 2-5 inches of rainfall through end of week
  • Tennessee Valley: 2-5 inches of rainfall through end of week
  • Southern Appalachians: 2-5 inches of rainfall through end of week
 

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.22.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 22, 2020 8:16:59 AM


Tropical Storm Beta made landfall around 10 p.m. CDT last night along the Matagorda Peninsula.  Beta is forecast to move very slowly, or even stall, just inland from the middle Texas coast on Tuesday and Tuesday night, continuing to bring heavy rainfall and flooding to parts of Texas and Louisiana. Meanwhile, Hurricane Teddy will remain in the Atlantic but bring dangerous rip currents, high surf, and swells to much of the East Coast. A low pressure system in the northeastern Pacific will bring rainfall to the Northwest by Wednesday. States with Active Advisories: Texas, Louisiana

While currently stalled just inland of the Texas coast, Beta should begin to move by Wednesday on a more northeastward track near or just inland from the upper Texas coast as it weakens to a tropical depression. Beta should become a remnant low by Thursday as it moves into the lower Mississippi Valley.  Portions of I-45, I-69, and I-610 are closed and/or flooded on the southern side of Houston. 


Flooding Rainfall

Significant Flash and Urban flooding is occurring, and will continue for the middle and upper Texas coast today.
  • Houston Metro:  6 to 10 inches of rainfall, with locally up to 20 inches
  • ArkLaTex Region:  3 to 5 inches of rainfall
  • Lower Mississippi Valley: 3 to 5 inches of rainfall

Flash flood watches have been issued by the National Weather Service from the middle Texas coast to southeast Louisiana, including Houston, Lake Charles and New Orleans.

 

Storm Surge
Surge Flooding will continue throughout the morning along the Texas coast within warning areas

 

Tropical-Storm-Force Winds
High winds will continue near portions of the Texas coast within the warning area today from Port Aransas, Texas, to Sabine Pass, Texas. The strongest winds will be in the offshore waters.

 

Tornadoes
A few tornadoes are also possible on the middle and upper Texas Coast and in southwest Louisiana through Tuesday.

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.21.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 21, 2020 8:01:59 AM


Summary - Tropical Storm Beta is centered just over 100 miles south of Galveston, Texas, and is moving westward towards the Texas coast at little over 5 mph. The expected slow motion of Beta will produce a long duration rainfall event, bringing the risk of storm surge and flooding from the middle Texas coast to southeast Louisiana. Meanwhile, Hurricane Teddy will remain in the Atlantic but bring swells, dangerous surf, and rip currents to much of the east coast. States with Active Advisories: Texas, Louisiana

After landfall, Beta will drift northeastward on the Texas coast Monday night through Wednesday.

Storm Surge
Impacting portions of the Texas and Louisiana coasts near times of high tide through Tuesday. Storm Surge warnings are in effect for the following areas:
  • Port Aransas, Texas, to the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana
  • This includes Copano Bay, Aransas Bay, San Antonio Bay, Matagorda Bay, Galveston Bay, Sabine Lake and Lake Calcasieu
Flooding Rainfall
Flash, Urban, and minor river flooding is likely. Rainfall will also spread northeastward through the end of the week. 
  • 5-10 inches, up to 15:  Southern Louisiana and the middle and upper Texas coast
  • 3-5 inches: Inland from the coast as far north and east as the ArkLaTex Region and the lower Mississippi Valley
Tropical-Storm-Force Winds
Spreading westward across the Texas coast later this morning and continue into Tuesday. Tropical Storm Warning are in effect for the following areas:
  • Port Aransas, Texas, to Morgan City, Louisiana
  • This includes Houston and Victoria, Texas, and Cameron, Louisiana
Tornadoes
Possible on the upper Texas Coast and in southwest Louisiana on Monday.
 
Hurricane Beta has been named because the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season names list was used up when storms Wilfred, Alpha and Beta all formed Friday. Additional storms will be named by letters in the Greek alphabet, which has only happened once before, in 2005. This is also the first time in the modern era that three new storms formed within 24 hours, with August 15, 1893 being the only other day in recorded history in which three storms formed on the same calendar day.

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.17.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 17, 2020 7:43:35 AM


Heavy rainfall, flooding, gusty winds, and the risk of a few tornadoes will continue over portions of the Southeast U.S. as Tropical Storm Sally gradually weakens. States with Active Advisories: Georgia, South Carolina, North  Carolina, Virginia

The center of Sally is about 50 miles southeast of Montgomery, Alabama. Sally is picking up forward speed and is weakening as it moves inland over the Deep South. Flooding rainfall and gusty winds continue to impact parts of Georgia and is spreading into the Carolinas.  Widespread flooding is expected from central Georgia through southeastern Virginia. Along the central Gulf Coast, most widespread moderate to major river flooding form the historic rainfall event will crest by the weekend, but rivers will remain elevated well into next week.

 

Flooding Rainfall: Georgia, South Carolina, North  Carolina, Virginia
  • Additional 3 to 6 inches, with totals up to 12 inches, is possible in central Georgia.
  • 3 to 6 inches, with locally up to 10 inches, in central and Upstate South Carolina.
  • 4 to 6 inches, with locally up to 8 inches, in western and central North Carolina into southeast Virginia.
Tornadoes: Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina
​Isolated tornadoes are possible through early Friday morning in parts of eastern Georgia, much of South Carolina and eastern North Carolina.
 
Transit Impacts:
Louisiana
  • I-55 closed due to flooding near Ruddock
Alabama
  • I-10 from Mobile to Florida state line
Florida 
  • US-98 from Alabama state line to Panama City
 
Sally became the eighth tropical cyclone in the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season to make a mainland U.S. landfall, a record number through mid-September. Sally also made landfall in the exact same location as Category 3 Hurricane Ivan in 2004.  More than 530,000 homes and businesses were without power across southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle as of about 7 p.m. CDT Wednesday.

 

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.16.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 16, 2020 8:23:43 AM


Hurricane Sally made landfall near Gulf Shores, Alabama at at 4:45 a.m. CDT as a Category 2 with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph.  Sally continues to move slowly north-northeastward into the coastline, with the slow movement bringing prolonged impacts to the Gulf Coast, including catastrophic flooding to portions of Florida and Alabama today along with damaging winds and the risk of tornadoes. Heavy rainfall will also advance north and east into Georgia and the western Carolinas. The storm will weaken quickly and pick up forward speed as it tracks inland across Alabama and Georgia later today through Thursday. States with Active Advisories: Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida

Flooding: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virgin
Historic and catastrophic flooding is unfolding along and just inland of the coast from west of Tallahassee FL to Mobile Bay AL. 
  • 8 to 12 inches, up to 35 inches from the western Florida Panhandle to extreme southern Alabama through Wednesday.
  • 4 to 8 inches, up to 12 inches, is possible farther inland across southern and central Alabama and central Georgia.
  • 4 to 6 inches, up to 9 inches, in western South Carolina and western and central North Carolina.
  • 2 to 5 inches, up to 7 inches, in southeast Virginia.
Storm Surge: Alabama, Florida
Storm surge is occurring along portions of the coastline from Alabama to the western Florida Panhandle. 
  • The peak storm surge will be near and to the right of where the center of Sally makes landfall. 
  • 4 to 7 feet from Dauphin Island, Alabama, to the Okaloosa/Walton County line in Florida, including Pensacola Bay and Choctawhatchee Bay.
Hurricane Conditions: Mississippi, Alabama, Florida
Hurricane conditions are expected this morning and continuing into this afternoon along the Mississippi and Alabama coastline and the western Florida Panhandle. 
  • Hurricane warnings remain in effect from coastal Alabama into the western Florida Panhandle.
  • Strong, damaging winds will continue to impact the Gulf Coast this morning near where Sally is moving inland.
Tornadoes: Alabama, Florida, Georgia
There will be a chance of isolated tornadoes from Sally Wednesday into Wednesday night, from southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle into southern Georgia.

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.15.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 15, 2020 8:39:43 AM


Hurricane Sally is moving near the coast of southeastern Louisiana and hurricane conditions are expected early Tuesday. Sally is expected to be a dangerous hurricane when it moves onshore along the north-central Gulf coast. Multiple impacts are expected with this system: extremely dangerous and life-threatening storm surge, hurricane-force winds, torrential rain with flash flooding and possible tornadoes. Sally will likely make landfall on Tuesday or Tuesday night with sustained winds of at least 110mph making it a strong and dangerous Category 2 storm. States with Active Advisories: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida

Sally is centered 105 miles south-southeast of Biloxi, Mississippi. Maximum sustained winds are currently at 85 mph, making Sally a Category 1 hurricane. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles from the center of the storm. Sally is expected to turn more northward later Tuesday into Wednesday, with the track shifting more eastward and landfall is now most likely to occur sometime on Wednesday from Mississippi to Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle.
 
Storm Surge Warning - Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida
A storm surge warning is in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line in Florida, including Mobile Bay. This means there will be a danger of life-threatening inundation from storm surge within the warning area in the next 36 hours.
  • 6 to 9 feet from Ocean Springs, Mississippi, to Dauphin Island, Alabama, including Mobile Bay.
  • 4 to 7 feet from Dauphin Island, Alabama, to the Florida border and from the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, including Lake Borgne.
The peak storm surge will be near and to the right of where the center of Sally makes landfall. Large waves could worsen the storm surge impacts in some areas and cause significant beach erosion on much of the northern Gulf Coast.
 
Flooding Rainfall - Mississippi, Alabama, Florida
Rainfall totals of up to 30 inches could result in historic flooding near and just inland from the northern Gulf Coast.
  • 10 to 20 inches with locally up to 30 inches on the Gulf Coast from the western Florida Panhandle to southern Alabama and far southeastern Mississippi through Wednesday. Serious flash flooding and moderate to major river flooding could occur in these areas.
  • 4 to 8 inches, with locally up to 12 inches, is possible farther inland across southeastern Mississippi, southern and central Alabama, northern Georgia and the western Carolinas. Significant flash and urban flooding is likely, as well as widespread minor to moderate flooding on some rivers in these areas.
Hurricane Warning - Mississippi, Alabama, Florida
Hurricane conditions are expected today within the hurricane warning area along the Mississippi and Alabama coastlines and the western Florida Panhandle. Tropical storm conditions are already ocurring in some of these areas.
  • East of the mouth of the Pearl River, Mississippi, to Navarre, Florida, including Biloxi, Mobile and Pensacola.
  • Hurricane conditions (winds 74 mph or greater) are expected in some parts of this area late Tuesday into Wednesday.
Tropical Storm Warning - Louisiana, Florida 
Tropical storm warnings are in effect to west and east of this hurricane warning, including portions of southeast Louisiana and the Florida Panhandle.
 
Tornado Watch - Alabama, Florida 
A tornado watch is in effect for coastal Alabama and the western and central Florida Panhandle until 6 p.m. CDT.
 
Sally is one of five named storms currently being tracked, tying a 1971 record for the most tropical cyclones at one time. 

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.14.20 - U.S.

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 14, 2020 8:47:07 AM


Tropical Storm Sally is forecast to become a Hurricane on Monday while approaching the northern Gulf Coast. Sally will bring hurricane conditions including strong winds, extremely dangerous and life-threatening surge, heavy rainfall with widespread significant flash flooding, isolated tornadoes and swells that are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. While it is too early to determine exactly where the storm center will move onshore, Sally's slow movement will result in prolonged impacts along the Gulf Coast. States with Active Advisories: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida

Sally is centered over 100 miles east-southeast of southeast Louisiana. The storm is lopsided right now with much of its rain and thunderstorm activity off to the east of its center. Bands of rain and gusty winds will be on the increase in parts of the northern Gulf Coast through the day on Monday.

Dangerous Storm Surge conditions are expected from Port Fourchon LA to the Alabama/Florida border. Hurricane conditions are expected later today from Morgan City, LA to the Mississippi/Alabama border, including New Orleans. Flash flooding is expected across central and northern FL, with flooding likely across southeast LA, MS, and AL before spreading farther across the Southeast U.S. later this week. 

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.10.20

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 10, 2020 7:53:42 AM


Wintry weather in the Rockies and Plains will gradually decrease. Heavy rain and flash flooding will be possible for central Texas, and portions of the East Coast. In addition, a couple of tropical disturbances off the Southeast coast and Florida warrant watching. States Active Advisories: Colorado, New Mexico

Colorado - Winter Weather Advisory - South Central. 1-3 inches of additional snow until noon MDT today.

New Mexico - Winter Weather Advisory - North Central. 1-3 inches of additional snow until 9 AM MDT Thursday.

Topics: weather

Weather Update 9.9.20

Posted by Jarrett on Sep 9, 2020 8:10:11 AM


Early-season winter weather conditions are impacting states in the American West, with cooler-than-average temperatures seen through much of the Central U.S. States with Active Advisories: Utah, Colorado, New Mexico

Utah - Winter Storm Warning - Northeast. 2 inches of additional snow until 6 AM MDT Wednesday. Impacting transit along I-15 from Brigham City to Salt Lake City, I-84 through Weber Canyon, and I-80 through the Mouth of Parleys Canyon.

 Colorado -  Winter Storm Warning - Central. 5-10 inches of additional snow until noon MDT Thursday. Impacting transit along I-70 between Silverthorne and Georgetown, and I-25 through Las Animas County, Aguilar, and Nevada Ave. 

New Mexico - Winter Storm Warning  - Northeast. 2-5 inches of additional snow and winds gusting up to 30mph until 6 PM MDT this evening. Impacting transit along I-25 north of Santa Fe.

Topics: weather

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